These are fall-back expectations that you can use when none of the other more specific expectations apply. The disadvantage is that you may get a less informative error message.

expect_true(object, info = NULL, label = NULL)

expect_false(object, info = NULL, label = NULL)

Arguments

object

object to test

info

extra information to be included in the message (useful when writing tests in loops).

label

object label. When NULL, computed from deparsed object.

Details

Attributes are ignored.

See also

is_false() for complement

Other expectations: comparison-expectations, equality-expectations, expect_length, expect_match, expect_named, inheritance-expectations, output-expectations

Examples

expect_true(2 == 2) # Failed expectations will throw an error
# NOT RUN { expect_true(2 != 2) # }
expect_true(!(2 != 2)) # or better: expect_false(2 != 2) a <- 1:3 expect_true(length(a) == 3) # but better to use more specific expectation, if available expect_equal(length(a), 3)